Laundromats to pool halls: Some of America’s quirkiest polling places

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A laundromat, bowling alley and a pool hall were some of the unusual places Americans cast their votes on Tuesday.

While many voters filled out mail-in ballots from home, some of those who ventured to the polls on Election Day found themselves in much quirkier surroundings.

In Chicago, for example, folks were able to cast their votes beside washing machines at the Su Nueva Laundromat. Others went to Lawn Lanes, a bowling alley that’s the designated polling place for about 750 voters in 2020, according to Smithsonian Magazine.

Also in the Windy City, pool hall Pressure Billiards and Café has been a polling place since at least 2012.

Los Angeles, meanwhile, had polling places ranging from Staples Center and Dodgers stadium to the historic Hollywood Pantages Theatre and the members-only club Magic Castle.

In San Francisco, bizarre voting spots included notorious leather bar The Eagle and the Museum of Ice Cream, as well as various breweries and theatres, SFIST reported.

2020 U.S. presidential election in Chicago, Illinois

A voter at Sam’s Auto Sales in Chicago today.

REUTERS

Across The U.S. Voters Flock To The Polls On Election Day

Across The U.S. Voters Flock To The Polls On Election Day

People voting in Orpheum Theatre today in Madison, Wisconsin.

Getty Images

Election Day voting at a polling station located in a mosque, Masjid Al-Fatiha, Azusa, California, United States - 03 Nov 2020

Election Day voting at a polling station located in a mosque, Masjid Al-Fatiha, Azusa, California, United States - 03 Nov 2020

A polling station in a mosque in Azusa, California.

Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times/Shu

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110320vote57RM

A voting center on Randall’s Island in the same building as the Manhattan Psychiatric Center.

Robert Miller

U.S. presidential election in New York

U.S. presidential election in New York

People voting in the Brooklyn Museum today.

REUTERS

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While some New Yorkers were able to vote at the Brooklyn Museum, Philadelphia residents had the folksy Mummers Museum, which commemorates the annual Mummers Parade, a time-honored tradition in the city.

The Big Apple also had the Manhattan Psychiatric Center on Wards Island open for voting — with polls located behind a heavy metal door.

In Iowa, folks could cast their ballots from a one-room schoolhouse in Sherman Township or an agricultural garage in Nevada Township.

Over in Wisconsin, Bay Beach, the ninth-oldest amusement park in the country, was a polling place, as was the historic Orpheum Theater in Madison.

From wherever they cast their ballots, those voting on Tuesday joined a record number of Americans, nearly 100 million, who voted early, either in-person or by mail in the 2020 election.

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