Is the “Your Netflix Account Will Be Locked” Text Message a Scam?

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If you though Netflix scams were staying behind in 2020, think again. Over the past few weeks, scammers have developed a new phishing scheme that involves sending Netflix subscribers a text falsely alerting them that their account will be locked due to invalid payment information. The text (or email, as some users have gotten) may look legit, but as many unsuspecting subscribers have quickly learned, it’s anything but — and that’s why it’s imperative that you know how to identify the new “Your Netflix Account Will Be Locked” text scam.

Do you have questions about the Netflix scam text message? Well, you’ve come to the right place. Here’s everything you need to know about this annoying (but effective) new phishing scam.

WHAT DOES THE NETFLIX SCAM TEXT MESSAGE SAY?

In recent weeks, users have begun receiving texts alerting them that their Netflix account has been suspended, and they will need to update their payment information to access it. “Your Netflix account will be locked because your payment was declined,” reads the text, which also includes a link to “update” your credit card information.

When you click the link, you’re taken to a fake page that has been created to look like a real Netflix form, but beware: it’s a complete scam.

IS THE “YOUR NETFLIX ACCOUNT WILL BE LOCKED” TEXT REAL?

No, the “Your Netflix Account Will Be Locked” text is not real. If you are asked to input your username, password, or credit card information on any website other than the official Netflix site, it’s likely that you’re the target of a phishing scam.

WHAT IS THE 469 AREA CODE WHERE THESE TEXTS ARE COMING FROM?

Twitter users have noticed that these phishing scams seem to be coming from numbers with a 469 area code, which represents the Dallas, Texas area. However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that the scammers live in Dallas, as it’s common practice to create a spoof phone number before sending a phishing text.

IS THIS THE ONLY NETFLIX TEXT SCAM?

Unfortunately, it is not. In late 2020, many users received texts and emails containing a “Netflix one year free offer,” another phishing attempt. Scammers have also targeted customers with special “promos,” pernicious Google Calendar links, and fake log-in notifications.

HOW TO SPOT FAKE NETFLIX TEXTS AND EMAILS

The Netflix Help Center features an in-depth guide to spotting phishing texts and emails from scammers claiming to be Netflix. The site notes that if you received “an email or text (SMS) requesting your Netflix username, password, or payment method,” it probably did not come from them directly. Subscribers will never be asked to enter their personal information (such as credit or debit card numbers, bank account information, or Netflix passwords) in a text or email. The company will also never request payment through a third party vendor or website, such a PayPal.

If you do receive a suspicious text or email, do not click any links or open any attachments. Instead, forward the email to [email protected]netflix.com, and the company will look into it.

However, if you’re reading this too late and you did fill enter any personal information, immediately change your Netflix password, contact your bank or financial institution, and update your password on other sites that may use the same username and password combination.

For more information on Netflix phishing scams, check out the service’s FAQ page.

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