Fearless: Left-wing social engineering explains Phylicia Rashad's loyalty to Bill Cosby

1

Bill Cosby remains a beloved figure in some corners of the American zeitgeist for the exact same reason former President Donald Trump rose to power.

The people in control of our academic, media, entertainment, and government institutions have gone way too far in their emasculation and demonization of men.

Sir Isaac Newton's third law explains: “For every action, there's an equal and opposite reaction.”

Humans, men and women, are attracted to, appreciate, and value masculinity. The left's defining of all masculinity as toxic and its attempt to eliminate that “toxic masculinity” has created a scarcity of masculine energy within our culture.

Why is gold considered such a valuable resource? It's finite. It's scarce.

The attack on male machismo has made it a new gold. President Trump intentionally emotes masculinity — some of it is fool's gold, some of it is gold-plated, and some it is authentic 14-karat gold. Trump understands the value of masculine energy in these times and adorns himself in bright gold chains like he's a gangsta rap star.

I bring this all up because Bill Cosby's lawyers won his release from prison on Wednesday. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court overturned Cosby's 2018 conviction on sexual assault, ruling that prosecutors violated an agreement not to charge the iconic comedian and TV star. More than 50 women have claimed that Cosby drugged and assaulted them.

Cosby's release sparked equal amounts of outrage, relief, and joy.

His “Cosby Show” co-star Phylica Rashad tweeted: “FINALLY!!!! A terrible wrong is being righted- a miscarriage of justice is corrected.”

Rashad's tweet provoked Janet Hubert, the actress who played “Aunt Viv” on “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air,” to write a rebuke of “Claire Huxtable.”

“Phylicia what are you thinking!!! I don't know you but to say this was terribly wrong. EVERYONE knew what he was doing back then. How could you NOT! Get your umbrella sista here comes the shit shower … I know 5 women who have not come forward. Enough Ya'll we know better. Powerful men do wrong things, black or white.”

Howard University, where Rashad was recently named dean of fine arts at the historically black university, issued a statement disavowing Rashad's tweet supporting Cosby.

Rashad is not alone in her support of Cosby's release. I'm in the group of people who were relieved when I heard the announcement. I recognize that the sheer number of Cosby accusers speak loudly and clearly about his behavior. Cosby used his position of power and influence to prey on women, the same way many people believe former President Bill Clinton did. I get it. Cosby is no victim.

But, honestly, I have to admit I'm attracted to, appreciate, and value what Cosby represented for so many years — the importance of fatherhood and family.

The emasculation and demonization of men have diminished the importance of fathers. This is especially true for black people. In-home fathers are scarce. Popular public figures who emphasize and promote nuclear family values are scarce.

The reshaping of family structure being led by Hollywood, the music industry, Black Lives Matter, corporate media, and academia devalues men and fathers. The matriarchy dominates black culture, a culture that has been programmed to celebrate degeneracy and the slaughter of black men in gang violence.

It's not hard to understand why some of us foolishly hold on to our affinity for Bill Cosby. He's the only popular icon who spoke fiercely on behalf of men and women who prioritize traditional family values.

Fatherhood is a scarce resource. Cosby sold fatherhood gold on every corner.

If that gold wasn't scarce, none of us would have any respect for Cosby. We would let go of our Cosby fondness the same way we let go of our fondness for popular R&B singer and imprisoned sexual predator R. Kelly. The product R. Kelly sold was promiscuous sex. You can get that product anywhere and from anybody. It's not scarce. In fact, it's in abundant supply.

Cosby offered something rare. No one has offered a replacement. Every TV, movie, music, and athletic star pretends that allowing 8-year-olds to gender transition is far more important than protecting the nuclear family.

So Phylicia Rashad clings to her despicably flawed television husband. We shouldn't feign bewilderment. Many of us who believe responsibly masculine men are necessary for a successful and just society feel like we're trapped in the desert with no water in sight.

Don't act surprised when we drink from the canteen of polluted men selling gold-plated truths.

View original post